Tag Archives: abstract art

Mark Rothko: Transcendent Emotion

Utter Rapture

“There can be no knowledge without emotion. We may be aware of a truth, yet until we have felt its force, it is not ours. To the cognition of the brain must be added the experience of the soul.” – Arnold Bennett

Taoism is one of the most eminent religious and philosophical constitutions of Eastern Asia. Cultivated for over two millennia, Taoism endured years of transformation and interpretation, yet has retained its basic principles. Tao (or Dao) translates as the “path” or “way” of life; therefore, Taoism speaks to the ebbs and flows, balance and orderliness, of the universe (Hansen, C., 2007). Due to its fluid nature, Taoism speaks to the impermanence of all things. Existence is the lack of the eternal, as nothing is everlasting. The process of decay is then just as encompassing as birth or renewal. Continue reading

Salvador Dali: The Living Unconscious

The Mind’s Eye

The difference between false memories and true ones is the same as for jewels: it is always the false ones that look the most real, the most brilliant.” – Salvador Dali

Helen Fukuhara, wife of a watercolor artist and daughter of an abstract painter, received her bachelor’s degree in music and speech arts. She later went on to study fine art, including ceramics, printmaking, and mixed media in Los Angeles. Eventually, she moved towards two-dimensional work. She is now 61 years old and continues to make art.

None of this sounds minutely interesting, as it almost appears to be a somewhat predictable storyline. Except that Helen is congenitally blind. Continue reading

(24 x 24) x 2